(via yomarvel)


handsomedogs:

cooper the 9 week old Dutch shepherd

handsomedogs:

cooper the 9 week old Dutch shepherd


fuckyeahconceptcarz:

1940 Chrysler Thunderbolt


(via aosfans)


(via aosfans)


medievalvisions:

Baltic women’s costumes.

(via swelarpers)


12-weeks-on:

Kindness always overcomes antagonism… Instead of confronting our children we need to remember to communicate with them, understanding the challenges they face and empathising

Communication is the fundemental building block of a good relationship and after all what more could we want for our children. Establishing a framework where they feel empowered and understand the boundaries of their actions drives their ability to make the right choices in life

12-weeks-on:

Kindness always overcomes antagonism… Instead of confronting our children we need to remember to communicate with them, understanding the challenges they face and empathising

Communication is the fundemental building block of a good relationship and after all what more could we want for our children. Establishing a framework where they feel empowered and understand the boundaries of their actions drives their ability to make the right choices in life

(via mother-child-life)


(via larpgirl)


How can there be too many children? That is like saying there are too many flowers.
Mother Teresa (via cultureshift)

How I saved our boat.

(A true story)

Yesterday my family and I were out on Pigeon Lake with a brand new motor on a very old boat. Someone had stolen the front seat over the summer, so I was sitting on the floor in the front, my mum and my brother were sitting on the middle seat, and my other brother and my dad (who was driving) were sitting in the back.

We were cruising around a small bay area near a bed and breakfast, enjoying the speed that the new motor offered, fairly close to shore, when over the sound of the motor I heard my dad say, “Why’s that guy waving his arms at us?” They were all squinting at the guy standing on the dock- I couldn’t see him from my vantage point on the floor but I felt the boat turn in that direction.

"He’s really waving his arms," my mum remarked, and I pulled myself into a kneeling position so I could see. There was the guy, looking very alarmed… and there was something strange in the water ahead of us. Instead of the deep blue colour of the rest of the lake, this water was a sandy brown, and the waves were breaking over it. I peered at it , more curious than anything else, when suddenly something clicked. "Hey… is that a rock?"

Dad didn’t hear me over the motor, but Mum did. “Rock!” she yelled, and Dad reacted immediately. The roar of the motor clicked into silence and the boat tilted wildly as we swung to avoid the rock. All of a sudden we were moving edge-on, speed decreasing exponentially until the bottom of the boat scraped against the low outer edge of the rock and brought us to a stop. Dad tilted the motor out of the water and we pushed off from the rock.

Now that we had come to a stop we could take a good look at the rock. It was much larger than it had appeared to be at first, flat-topped and jagged-edged, hiding just below the surface of the water. If Dad hadn’t shut off the motor and turned the boat- in other words, if we’d hit it head on at full speed… I don’t care to think about it. At the very least, the new motor would’ve been wrecked. It was crazy that there was no buoy to mark such a dangerous rock.

We waved at the guy on the dock and yelled thank yous. I thought it was ironic; they’d been so busy staring at the waving guy and trying to figure out what he wanted that they hadn’t seen the rock he was trying to warn them of. If it hadn’t been for me, they wouldn’t have seen it until they hit it. And that’s how I saved the boat.